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A Lichtenberg prophecy – Giorgio Agamben

“Our world will become so civilized that it will then be ridiculous to believe in G-d, as it is today to believe in ghosts. Then, after a while, the world will become even more civilized. And the process that will bring him to the supreme summit of civilization will continue faster and faster. Touching the pinnacle, expert judgment will once again be reversed and knowledge will reach its extreme transformation. Then – and this will really be the end – we will only believe in ghosts.“

Source: Giorgio Agamben – QUODLIBET

*Translated

Note:

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1 July 1742 – 24 February 1799) was a German physicist, satirist, and Anglophile. As a scientist, he was the first to hold a professorship explicitly dedicated to experimental physics in Germany. He is remembered for his posthumously published notebooks, which he himself called Sudelbücher, a description modelled on the English bookkeeping term “scrapbooks”, and for his discovery of tree-like electrical discharge patterns now called Lichtenberg figures.

Header: Manaslu at sunrise

Note:

Manaslu (Nepali: मनास्लु, also known as Kutang) is the eighth-highest mountain in the world at 8,163 metres (26,781 ft) above sea level. It is in the Mansiri Himal, part of the Nepalese Himalayas, in the west-central part of Nepal. The name Manaslu means “mountain of the spirit” and is derived from the Sanskrit word manasa, meaning “intellect” or “soul”.

In 1954, a Japanese team approaching from the Buri Gandaki route to the peak faced a hostile group of villagers at Samagaon camp. The villagers thought that the previous expeditions had displeased the gods, causing the avalanches that destroyed the Pung-gyen Monastery and the death of 18 people. As a result of this hostility, the team made a hasty retreat to Ganesh Himal. To appease local sentiments, a large donation was made to rebuild the monastery. However, this philanthropic act did not ease the atmosphere of distrust and hostility towards Japanese expeditions. Even the expedition in 1956 which successfully climbed the mountain faced this situation and as a result the next Japanese expedition only took place in 1971.

In 1956, Toshio Imanishi (Japan) and Gyaltsen Norbu (Sherpa) made the first ascent of Manaslu on May 9, 1956.