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Open question: “Will you die mentally with the Philistines?” – 103 fm – Prof. Yoram Lass

Summary of the day at 103 fm Maariv Israel – Prof. Yoram Lass

One listener asked to comment on the prime minister’s conduct:

“He clings to the horns of the altar, and he ignores the fact that he is the cause of the whole situation in the country.”

“Netanyahu drops the house on us, but we are not his enemies”

What is stated in this item expresses the personal opinion of the broadcaster and is not presented as a substitute for receiving individual advice from a professional who specializes in the field, and should not be relied on in any way. Any action and use made on the basis of the content appearing in the item is the sole responsibility of the user.

13/08/2020

Audio – link

Notes:

Samson (/ˈsæmsən/; Hebrew: שִׁמְשׁוֹן‎, Shimshōn‎, “man of the sun”) was the last of the judges of the ancient Israelites mentioned in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible (chapters 13 to 16) and one of the last of the leaders who “judged” Israel before the institution of the monarchy. He is sometimes considered to be an Israelite version of the popular Near Eastern folk hero also embodied by the Sumerian Enkidu and the Greek Heracles.

The biblical account states that Samson was a Nazirite, and that he was given immense strength to aid him against his enemies and allow him to perform superhuman feats, including slaying a lion with his bare hands and massacring an entire army of Philistines using only the jawbone of a donkey. However, if Samson’s long hair were cut, then his Nazirite vow would be violated and he would lose his strength.

Samson was betrayed by his lover Delilah, who ordered a servant to cut his hair while he was sleeping and turned him over to his Philistine enemies, who gouged out his eyes and forced him to grind grain in a mill at Gaza. While there, his hair began to regrow. When the Philistines took Samson into their temple of Dagon, Samson asked to rest against one of the support pillars. After being granted permission, he prayed to G-d and miraculously recovered his strength, allowing him to bring down the columns, collapsing the temple and killing himself as well as all of the Philistines. In some Jewish traditions, Samson is believed to have been buried in Tel Tzora in Israel overlooking the Sorek valley.

Samson has been the subject of both rabbinic and Christian commentary, with some Christians viewing him as a type of Jesus, based on similarities between their lives. Samson also plays a major role in Western art and traditions.

Samson Option

The Samson Option (Hebrew: ברירת שמשון‎, b’rerat shimshon) is the name that some military analysts and authors have given to Israel’s deterrence strategy of massive retaliation with nuclear weapons as a “last resort” against a country whose military has invaded and/or destroyed much of Israel. Commentators also have employed the term to refer to situations where non-nuclear, non-Israeli actors, have threatened conventional weapons retaliation, such as Yasser Arafat and Hezbollah.

The name is a reference to the biblical Israelite judge Samson who pushed apart the pillars of a Philistine temple, bringing down the roof and killing himself and thousands of Philistines who had captured him, crying out “Let me die with the Philistines!” (Judges 16:30).

According to Brig. Gen. Yitzhak Yaakov, who was the mastermind behind the “Samson Option”, it was unlikely Israel could have even targeted Europe, as Israel did not yet have other measures like bombs or missiles to carry the nuclear payload.

In 2012, in response to Günter Grass’s poem “Was gesagt werden muss” (“What Must Be Said”) which criticized Israel’s nuclear weapons program, Israeli poet and Holocaust survivor Itamar Yaoz-Kest published a poem entitled “The Right to Exist: a Poem-Letter to the German Author” which addresses Grass by name.

It contains the line: “If you force us yet again to descend from the face of the Earth to the depths of the Earth — let the Earth roll toward the Nothingness.”

Jerusalem Post journalist Gil Ronen saw this poem as referring to the Samson Option, which he described as the strategy of using Israel’s nuclear weapons, “taking out Israel’s enemies with it, possibly causing irreparable damage to the entire world.”

Header: Samson’s Fight with the Lion (1525) by Lucas Cranach the Elder