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Virus deaths soar in US, Europe just Trump sees light at end of tunnel

The United States saw nearly 2,000 coronavirus deaths for a second day running as the toll soared again in Europe, despite US President Donald Trump’s insistence that there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Governments are grappling with how to balance public safety against the devastating economic impact of stay-at-home orders that have erased millions of jobs in a matter of weeks.

More than 86,000 people worldwide have died in the virus crisis, which has sent the global economy spiraling and forced billions of people to remain at home as much as possible.

As the economic downturn starts to bite, health experts stressed that any premature loosening of restrictions could accelerate the spread of a contagion that has already infiltrated nearly every country.

In France, one of the hardest-hit nations in Europe with more than 10,000 deaths, President Emmanuel Macron will address the nation next week to explain the path forward.

The confinement order issued on March 17 “will be extended” beyond the current deadline of April 15, an official close to Macron told AFP.

The United States reported the highest one-day toll on record, with 1,973 deaths over a 24-hour period — reaching nearly 2,000 for the second day in a row.

Italy and Spain are still recording hundreds of deaths a day, and the situation is also deteriorating in Britain, which saw a record 938 fatalities Wednesday as Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent a third day in intensive care.

The 55-year-old leader’s condition is “improving” and he is in “good spirits,” officials assured the public.

In New York, the epicenter of the US outbreak, the state’s governor noted the new single-day high for virus deaths at 779, but offered an optimistic view for the weeks to come.

“We are flattening the curve,” Andrew Cuomo told reporters, as he cited a decreasing hospitalization rate due to stay-at-home orders.

That optimism was shared by US President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, who both said the data seemed to indicate a turn for the better.

“We are hopefully heading towards a final stretch, the light at the end of the tunnel,” Trump told reporters.

Pence chimed in: “We’re beginning to see glimmers of hope.”

In the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the novel coronavirus first emerged in December, there was cause for celebration as a ban on outbound travel was lifted.

But Malta joined the ranks of those in mourning, recording its first death.

Global trade to plummet

The head of the World Trade Organization, Roberto Azevedo, issued a dire warning, saying the economic fallout from the health emergency could be “the deepest economic recession or downturn of our lifetimes.”

Germany and France, the EU’s two largest economies, are bracing for a painful hit.

Gross domestic product in export powerhouse Germany is expected to shrink by nearly 10 percent in the second quarter, the country’s leading research institutes said.

France is already in a technical recession, the Bank of France said. Its first-quarter performance was its worst since 1945.

But officials at the US Federal Reserve said the wide-ranging shuttering of businesses should not have the lasting impact that was seen in the wake of the global financial crisis in 2008.

As some European countries weighed easing lockdown measures to allow economic activity to resume in earnest, the World Health Organization urged against it.

“Now is not the time to relax measures,” said WHO’s Europe director Hans Kluge.

“It is the time to once again double and triple our collective efforts to drive towards suppression with the whole support of society.”

Stages of grief

Around the world, medical staff are bearing a heavy physical and emotional toll as they work in overflowing intensive care units and makeshift hospitals erected in sports stadiums, on ships and even in a New York cathedral.

In Spain, another 757 deaths were reported Wednesday, bringing the toll up for a second day after several days of decline.

Antonio Alvarez, a 33-year-old nurse at a Barcelona hospital, described his experience as akin to bereavement.

“I’ve had my phases of anger, of denial — you go through all of them,” he told AFP. “Now we are still a little overwhelmed but it is better. Fewer patients are dying.”

In Italy, police have started to tighten lockdown controls as cabin fever and a slowing of the death toll tempted residents out in increasing numbers.

Jews around the world marked the start of Passover without the large family gatherings normally organized for the seder meal, with some turning to virtual platforms.

“The Passover holiday is celebrated with friends and families,” Yigel Niasoff, 45, told AFP from his balcony in New York’s Crown Heights neighborhood.

“Right now with the pandemic, it’s a very, very sad time.”

Bailout efforts

Governments worldwide are rolling out staggering stimulus measures to ease the economic pain.

In Washington, Democrats demanded an additional $500 billion to battle the crisis, doubling the government’s request to help small businesses and imperiling the rapid approval of emergency aid lawmakers sought this week.

The eurozone is also mired in bickering over a bailout plan for its hard-hit members that would come on top of measures enacted by individual governments. Talks resume Thursday.

The markets continued their volatile movement, with the Dow closing up 3.4 percent in New York after European stocks faltered.

For those who have lost their jobs during the crisis, survival is already a struggle.

“With the coronavirus, I’m suffocating,” 55-year-old Gabriel Rodriguez told AFP in Miami, where he spent five hours in line to apply for unemployment benefits.

“I have to pay for the car, I have to pay the phone bill — how am I going to pay that? And the rent too!”

Header: An Israeli man stands on his hands on an empty road during a lockdown following government measures to help stop the spread of the coronavirus, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Wednesday, April 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)