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Volunteers taking part in third stage of Russian COVID-19 trials won’t be hospitalized

Volunteers taking part in the third stage of the clinical trials of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine developed by the N. F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology will not be hospitalized, head of the center Alexander Ginzberg told TASS.

“Of course, the volunteers won’t be hospitalized beforehand. All of them will come and go from their homes,” he said.

Ginzburg added that the volunteers would donate blood for testing on the first day of the trials.

“This is done so that there will be a starting point, so that we can compare a rise in antibodies,” he noted.

The next blood test will be made in 21 days after the first vaccine shot and in 21 days after the second one.

The researcher said that so far, there is no final protocol on clinical trials after the vaccine’s registration, however, he assumed that the trials would be less rigorous.

Earlier, Ginzburg said that all volunteers taking part in the clinical trials of the vaccine would receive insurance and would get a compensation.

On August 11, Russia became the first country to register a coronavirus vaccine, which was named Sputnik V. Russian Health Minister Mikhail Murashko informed that the vaccine created by the N. F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology had shown its effectiveness and safety on the outcomes of clinical trials. It was created on a platform that had been used for the development of a number of other vaccines. According to the Russian Health Ministry, experience shows that such vaccines are capable of developing long-term immunity that lasts for up to two years. Head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF) Kirill Dmitriev pointed out that Russia had received applications for more than 1 bln doses of the vaccine from 20 countries.

Head of the N. F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology Alexander Ginzburg hopes that Russians will get full access to the novel coronavirus vaccine developed by the center in about 9-12 months.

“It is important to understand when we will be able to meet the demand of the country. I hope that it will happen within 9-12 months,” he told TASS.

Earlier, Russian Health Minister Mikhail Murashko said during a session with Russian President Vladimir Putin that medical workers and teachers would be the first to get the vaccine. The head of the Gamaleya Research Center noted that the amount of vaccine doses will be enough to vaccinate the first groups of the population.

Ginzburg informed that the vaccine would first be supplied to 10-15 regions of the country, however, he did not specify where.

He added that in a about a month, about one million vaccine doses would be produced at three plants producing monoclonal antibodies.

“By the end of the year, there will be 1.5-2 mln doses produced. These are tangible and good numbers on the country’s scale,” he said.

On August 11, Russia became the first country to register a coronavirus vaccine, which was named Sputnik V. Russian Health Minister Mikhail Murashko informed that the vaccine created by the N. F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology had shown its effectiveness and safety on the outcomes of clinical trials. It was created on a platform that had been used for the development of a number of other vaccines. According to the Russian Health Ministry, experience shows that such vaccines are capable of developing long-term immunity that lasts for up to two years. Head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF) Kirill Dmitriev pointed out that Russia had received applications for more than 1 bln doses of the vaccine from 20 countries.

Header: In this handout photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, and provided by Russian Direct Investment Fund, an employee shows a new vaccine at the Nikolai Gamaleya National Center of Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, Russia. Russia on Tuesday, Aug. 11 became the first country to approve a coronavirus vaccine for use in tens of thousands of its citizens despite international skepticism about injections that have not completed clinical trials and were studied in only dozens of people for less than two months. (Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/ Russian Direct Investment Fund via AP)

Source: TASS